REVIEW: Black Moth – The Killing Jar

Coming from Leeds, the talented quartet, Harriet Bevan – vocals, Jim Swainston – guitar, Dave Vachon – bass, and Dom McCready – drums, are bringing you their debut album,...

Coming from Leeds, the talented quartet, Harriet Bevan – vocals, Jim Swainston – guitar, Dave Vachon – bass, and Dom McCready – drums, are bringing you their debut album, The Killing Jar, an obscure and vicious record produced by the Grinderman and Bad Seed’s, Nick Cave and Jim Sclavunos. Sounds good, right? Wait ‘till you hear it, it’s even better.

The album is a complex mixture of genres and influences, all dark and heavy. It might seem like a mess at times, but the saying ‘order ab chao’, from chaos comes order, goes very well here. Black Moth mix in Stoner rock, Black Sabbath riffs and a bit of Motorhead with punk and grunge influences. Its atmosphere combines a little Alice Cooper and a bit of Marilyn Manson’s The Golden Age of Grotesque aesthetics, gloomy, nihilistic and malicious, all expressed by the edgy, contemptuous voice of Harriet Bevan.

It begins with The Articulate Dead, a powerful but melodic song, starting with heavy bass and pounding drums, song which becomes more aggressive and punk influenced in its second half. The second one, Blackbirds Fall is a complete Stoner rock, Black Sabbath influenced piece with a slower tempo, spiteful voice and ominous imagery.

Banished but Blameless is edgy and catchy at first but slowly transforms into something else with its strong guitars and soft lethargic voice, while Spit out your teeth is a mixture of Stoner rock and grunge with trash metal riffs and Motorhead influences.

The album continues with The plague of our age, a heavy bass, gloomy song while Chicken shit is a completely different story. It’s a filthy song, a chaotic but overall unitary piece. It alternates melodic instrumentals and clear vocals with fast, nails-on-the-board rhythms, scornful voice and disturbing laughter, elements which make it one of my favourite songs on the album. Stoner rock and heavy metal rhythms are again reunited in Blind faith.

The eight one, Plastic blaze, begins with a Black Sabbath like intro which seems at first a very oppressive, doom influenced piece but which continues on its usual dark tone and heavy metal rhythms. Land of the sky is a lighter song, well, as light as Black Moth songs can be, so basically, not pitch black, but a softer grey, with faster voice tempo and catchy sounds.

The album ends with Honey Lung this slower but still dark and gloomy piece which brings out some great, twisted sounds resembling Marilyn Manson’s The Golden Age of Grotesque.

This album is a sound start for what seems to be a very promising rock band and will be released by New Heavy Sounds Records on the 7th of May. If you can’t wait until then – and hell, who could blame you? – you can check them out in a couple of locations in the UK:

5th April – The Library, Leeds w/ Truck Fighters
5th May – Live At Leeds, Leeds
6th May – Camden Crawl, London
11th May – The Great Escape, Brighton

Words: Black Cat

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